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  • Front-end alignment focuses on the front wheels only. This type of alignment is common in vehicles with a solid rear axle.

Front-End Alignment:

  • Four-wheel alignment, also known as all-wheel alignment, involves adjusting all four wheels. This is typical in vehicles with independent rear suspension and is more comprehensive in addressing alignment issues.

Four-Wheel Alignment:

Types of Wheel Alignment:

  • Camber refers to the vertical tilt of the wheels. Proper camber ensures that the tire treads wear evenly. Negative camber means the top of the tire leans inward, while positive camber means it leans outward.

Camber:

  • Toe is the angle at which the tires point inward or outward when viewed from above. Toe alignment affects tire wear and straight-line stability. Toe can be "toe-in" (tires point slightly inward) or "toe-out" (tires point slightly outward).

Toe:

  • Caster is the angle of the steering axis when viewed from the side. It influences steering stability, cornering, and returnability. Positive caster helps with stability but can affect steering effort.

Caster:

Alignment Angles:

  • If you notice uneven wear on the tread of your tires, it may indicate alignment issues.

Uneven Tire Wear:

  • If your vehicle pulls to one side, especially when driving on a straight road, it could be a sign of misaligned wheels.

Vehicle Pulling to One Side:

  • An off-center steering wheel when driving straight suggests alignment problems.

Steering Wheel Off-Center:

  • Vibrations or a shimmy in the steering wheel, especially at certain speeds, may be due to alignment issues.

Vibration or Steering Wheel Shimmy:

  • Misaligned wheels can cause tire scrubbing, leading to squealing noises.

Squealing Tires:

Signs You Need Wheel Alignment:

  • Camber refers to the vertical tilt of the wheels. Proper camber ensures that the tire treads wear evenly. Negative camber means the top of the tire leans inward, while positive camber means it leans outward.

Vehicle Inspection:

  • Toe is the angle at which the tires point inward or outward when viewed from above. Toe alignment affects tire wear and straight-line stability. Toe can be "toe-in" (tires point slightly inward) or "toe-out" (tires point slightly outward).

Alignment Measurements:

  • Caster is the angle of the steering axis when viewed from the side. It influences steering stability, cornering, and returnability. Positive caster helps with stability but can affect steering effort.

Adjustments:

  • A test drive may be conducted to ensure that the vehicle drives straight, without pulling or vibration.

Test Drive:

  • The mechanic performs a final check of the alignment to confirm that it meets the specified parameters.

Final Check:

Wheel Alignment Process:

  • Alignment should be checked after significant suspension repairs or component replacements.

After Suspension Repairs:

  • It's advisable to check alignment after getting new tires to ensure even wear.

After Tire Replacement:

  • Regular alignment checks, perhaps annually or at specific mileage intervals, can help catch and correct alignment issues early.

Annually or at Mileage Intervals:

  • A significant impact with a curb, pothole, or other obstacles can throw off wheel alignment.

After Hitting a Curb or Pothole:

  • If you notice signs of misalignment, such as uneven tire wear or steering issues, it's advisable to get an alignment check.

When Notable Signs Occur:

When to Get a Wheel Alignment: